Learn about Neuroscience


About Neuroscience

The task of neuroscience is to explain behaviour in terms of the activities of the brain – how it marshals its billions of individual nerve cells to produce behaviour, and how these cells are influenced by the environment.

The scientific study of the nervous system has increased significantly during the second half of the twentieth century, principally due to advances in molecular biology, electrophysiology, and computational neuroscience. This has allowed neuroscientists to study the nervous system in all its aspects: how it is structured, how it works, how it develops, how it malfunctions, and how it can be changed. Neuroscience is also capable of providing us with insights into the human mind that only a few decades ago would have been considered the stuff of science fiction.


Cognitive and behavioural neuroscience

At the cognitive level, cognitive neuroscience addresses the questions of how psychological functions are produced by neural circuitry. The emergence of powerful new measurement techniques such as neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI, PET, SPECT), electrophysiology, and human genetic analysis combined with sophisticated experimental techniques from cognitive psychology allows neuroscientists and psychologists to address abstract questions such as how human cognition and emotion are mapped to specific neural substrates.

Neuroscience is also allied with the social and behavioural sciences as well as nascent interdisciplinary fields such as neuroeconomics,decision theory, and social neuroscience to address complex questions about interactions of the brain with its environment.

Ultimately neuroscientists would like to understand every aspect of the nervous system, including how it works, how it develops, how it malfunctions, and how it can be altered or repaired. The specific topics that form the main foci of research change over time, driven by an ever-expanding base of knowledge and the availability of increasingly sophisticated technical methods. Over the long term, improvements in technology have been the primary drivers of progress. Developments in electron microscopy, computers, electronics, functional brain imaging, and most recently genetics and genomics, have all been major drivers of progress.

The science behind PRISM

Zenlinx is an online platform. All our solutions are based on PRISM Brain Mapping methodology.

Brain Mapping is a neuroscience-based method specifically designed to identify the behavioural preferences that directly relate to personal relationships and work performance.

PRISM Brain Mapping is a unique way of identifying people's behaviour preferences based on brain activity. Unlike traditional psychometric instruments, PRISM approaches human behaviour from the perspective of neuroscience, rather than psychological theory. This exciting approach takes advantage of some of the most up-to-date neuroscience discoveries to provide users with a series of 'maps' which are representations of how their brain prefers to work.

PRISM's reports, therefore, show not only people's natural or instinctive behaviour preference, but also the extent and the way in which they modify or adapt their preference on occasions to respond to what you see as the demands of specific situations e.g. their jobs.

The remarkable complexity of the brain has shown that human beings cannot credibly be divided up into a fixed number of types of groups of people who are unable to act outside of their preferences. PRISM does not, therefore, label people or fit them into 'boxes', nor does it have 'scores', or right or wrong answers. Instead, it provides users with a powerful, graphic explanation for why they approach situations and individuals in different ways. The reports also offer you an insight into one person's true potential, as well as what may be hindering this person in achieving even higher performance.

Rather than the theoretical concepts of many traditional tests, PRISM measures what people like doing and the corresponding behavioural characteristics.

In addition to PRISM's eight behaviour dimensions, the report identifies and measures 26 key aspects of Career Development. This information allows you to make many links between your behaviour, natural behaviour preferences and your work behaviour. In the particular situation of the career development, we will leverage the results of the individual reports to support students in growing awareness about self and others, and acquiring the skills in a professional (work) environment. Users understand their own style and work preference, their own communication preference when dealing with others and deal effectively with different styles and personalities.

PRISM provides users with a powerful, graphic explanation for why they approach situations and individuals in different ways. Each PRISM 'map' is a picture of the user as a UNIQUE individual.

Self-awareness is your first step towards a great career

Inspiring leaders, when they look back on their career, very often admit that one of their main factor for success was to perfectly know themselves, their style their strengths, and their limits

    Building self-awareness is knowing:


  1. Your natural style and the way you come across to others
  2. Your strengths and areas for development
  3. Your deep-down values, and the things that really keep you moving in your everyday life
  4. Your long term objectives and the way you want to move forward
  5. Your behavioural styles and work preferences
  6. All the things that make you different to others

  7. It is very important to build self-awareness, because it will help you:


  8. Build confidence about who you are and what you can bring to others
  9. Pick the direction in your career that will make a full use of your potential
  10. Communicate better with others and become more influential, thus respected
  11. Build rapport and relationship with others by showing up as someone confident, true to self and others

Building self-awareness will help you take control of your life, your career, your future. It is the foundation of who you are, who you want to be, and how you want to show up to others.

Building your PRISM Brain Mapping profile is the perfect tool to grow self-awareness as each individual PRISM profile provides you with a comprehensive report about you, your style, the way you communicate, behave, react to different types of environment, adapt to situations, show up to others…

6 reasons why PRISM Brain Mapping is different

1. A tool for complex human beings

Many personality and assessment tests are based on bi-polar scales (either/or) type of questions. In other words they identify people as either one thing or another. PRISM differs in how data is gathered and reveals balances and imbalances instead of the 'typecasting' that comes from bi-polar methods. These over simplified labels make no allowance for subtle, yet crucial, differences between people or the reasons why they behave in certain ways. PRISM is designed to understand why we individuals behave in certain ways in specific situations and in becoming skilled at adjusting and adapting our behaviour to meet the behaviour needs of others.


2. No outsmarting!

A recurrent concern from Human Resources professionals and recruiters is that the tool they use for recruitment are too easy to 'trick' by the candidates who wish to influence the results of their test to get more chance to be recruited for a certain role. PRISM Brain Mapping is designed on a methodology different to standard psychometric test, the questionnaire is more complex and it as a unique system that allows you to see whether a candidate has been consistent in his or her answers of the questionnaire.


3. Not a psychometric test!

PRISM is not a 'psychometric test'. Most psychometric tests are designed to measure responses to the particular theory that underpins the test. For example, the MBTI is largely based on the typological theories of Carl Jung and adapted by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers, and 16PF is based on Raymond Cattell's theory of 16 'primary factors'.

Inevitably, psychometric tests and PRISM are often seen to compete in the marketplace among people interested in learning more about themselves and others. However, they actually stem from very different theoretical origins, have been designed for different purposes and take different approaches to representing behaviour patterns. Therefore, it is inappropriate to make direct comparisons between the two approaches.

Unfortunately those who have only a limited knowledge of the two sciences attempt to make such comparisons as a means to achieve understanding. PRISM is not presented as an alternative to psychometric tests, rather as a means to enhance understanding of how behaviour is created.


4. 8 dimensions and 26 key aspects of Career Development

In addition to PRISM's eight behaviour dimensions, the report identifies and measures 26 key aspects of Career Development. This information allows you to make many links between your behaviour, natural behaviour preferences and your work behaviour. In the particular situation of the career development, we will leverage the results of the individual reports to support students in growing awareness about self and others, and acquiring the skills in a professional (work) environment. Participants will understand their own style and work preference, their own communication preference when dealing with others and deal effectively with different styles and personalities.


5. The brain matters

The PRISM system is different from any other assessment methodology in that it is about actual observed behaviour and the role that the brain has in generating that behaviour. PRISM plots an individual's behaviour preferences on a diagram of the human brain. It works by taking human behaviour as both a response and stimulus, and enables people to identify the way they and others behave, and manage their behaviour to achieve desired outcomes.

PRISM describes the internal workings of the brain, an objective and tangible schematic model allowing us to understand the neural regions/circuits that regulate our cerebral/mental/emotional and body actions. PRISM is about focussing more on why people do what they do - from inborn neuroscientific and genetic perspectives. This does not mean users need to know the scientific intricacies, but by just comprehending the raw basics, they will have a much greater understanding, appreciation, and tolerance for why people (including themselves) do what they do.


6. Easy-to-use

PRISM produces a wide range of easy to understand charts and reports to help users gain an insights into their behaviour preferences. The PRISM report enables you to gain an insight into your behavioural preferences from several points of view, such as Emotional Intelligence, Mental Toughness, and the 'Big Five'.

How valid is your test?

Choosing the right methodology is critical.

The validation process establishes that assessment instruments score accurately, thus predicting performance.

Internal consistency (validity) is usually measured with Cronbach's Alpha, a statistic calculated from the paired correlations between items. Internal consistency ranges between zero and one. A commonly-accepted rule of thumb is that an α of 0.7 indicates acceptable reliability, and 0.8 or higher indicates good reliability. High reliabilities (0.96 or higher) are not necessarily desirable, as this indicates that some of the items may be entirely redundant.

PRISM has been the subject of a two-year university study (Stanford University, California) using Cronbach Alpha coefficients to measure inter-item correlation for internal validity. The study produced results indicating very high levels of internal consistency for the subscales. For all the four-colour subscales the reliability scores were above 0.90. This is a very high level of internal consistency, and it is one of the highest scores available.

Overall, the PRISM eight dimensions scored between 0.86 and 0.92. In separate studies, temporal stability (test-retest reliability), ranged from 0.88 to 0.89 after one week, 0.74 to 0.87 after six months and 0.71 to 0.82 after one year.

In comparison, other assessment methodologies typically range from 0.15 to 0.60, with the majority averaging between 0.20 and 0.40.